Ribble’s Nine Elements of Digital Citizenship, and a Critical Questions on TikTok

This far into my major project I have been compiling information on Wakelet, Seesaw, and TikTok.  Be sure to check out the continued progress of the work that I am compiling on my second website, Curtis Bourassa’s Edtech Reviews. Over the past couple of weeks, I have begun to branch out and approach teachers about each one of the apps that I am studying.  In addition, I have gone to PD sessions for some of the apps that I am studying and building off of the connections and resources that I have made. 

Last week we learned about Mike Ribble’s nine elements of digital citizenship.  These elements help provide a framework for me to use these apps in the educational setting.  I will be following Jennifer Casa-Todd’s format of how to implement these tools into Education from her book, SocialLEADia.  I will highlight how my tools can be used in accordance with Mike Ribble’s Nine Elements.  

  • Digital access 
  • Digital communication
  • Digital Law
  • Digital security
  • Digital commerce
  • Digital health and wellness
  • Digital literacy
  • Digital etiquette 
  • Digital rights and responsibilities 

These digital elements can apply to many online tools or apps. Using Ribble’s framework will “help direct questions and your teaching when practicing digital leadership”.

Seesaw

  • Connect with students and other classes from around the world, and create a global classroom (Digital Communication)
  • Recognize that not everyone has access to the technology, or that the access is not equal access. (Digital Access)
  • Even young students can learn how to use technology appropriately by commenting and responding thoughtfully in a controlled environment (Digital Etiquette)
  • Ask thoughtful and critical questions when are not sure of someone’s content of questions (Digital Communication)

Wakelet

  • Students have the ability to curate their own resources.  This could provide the opportunity for students to look at in-depth their resources.  To determine if their resources are credible and reliable. (Digital Literacy)
  • Students will have the ability to collaborate on resources together.  Or send resource lists to each other. (Digital Communication)
  • Students will use material ethically, including citing sources appropriately.  (Digital Rights and Responsibilities)

TikTok

  • Provide content in a meaningful way, get students to determine the purpose of their content. (Digital Communication, Digital Etiquette) 
  • Look at in-depth terms of service agreements, and privacy policy.  What does this app track, how is it using my data? (Digital law, digital literacy, digital security)
  • Understand that anyone can see our post even if they are not following us.  (Digital Security)
  • Understand and set up guidelines for using TikTok, appropriate time and place, using (Digital health and wellness)
  • By using the digital wellbeing portion of the app users can limit screen time and restrictive content within TikTok. 
  • Understanding and reporting inappropriate use, or content on TikTok (Digital Rights and Responsibilities)

As educators, the connections above list some of the practices we would want our students to follow as a (digital) citizen in the above apps mentioned. When it comes to teaching students, as Jennifer Casa-Todd states, this is based on what we want students to know but we have to be explicit about what we are teaching. 

Major Project Update

Within my major digital project, I am spending a lot of time researching and exploring TikTok. I am struggling to find an appropriate way personally to rationalize TikTok used as an educational app. This is due to the questionable content that is found within the app. However, I also realize that the majority of middle year to high school students are users of TikTok.  Therefore it provides an opportunity for education and learning opportunities for TikTok. I have reached out to some teachers that are using TikTok in the classroom. On one of my early morning commutes to work, I decided to listen to The House of Edtech one of my educational podcasts focusing on edtech, the episode, TikTok for Teachers and #TikTokEDU. I then went on to look more in-depth on how these teachers are using TikTok in the classroom.  I ended up following Jeremy Rinkel, and reaching out regarding some future questions I have of using TikTok in education. 

Here are some other TikTok teachers/students to explore on TikTok. 

  • Brooke Pavek: A High School Senior Student who creates creative videos that could be directly linked to curricular outcomes in many areas.  Check out this TIME article showcasing some of Brooke’s creative work.
  • Brooke Rogers: a Middle School English teacher, who creates teacher content and student content. 
  • Jeremy Rinkel: A High School English Teacher, who creates content for students and teachers. 

After listening to the podcast what really stood out to me was that many of these teachers are not just creating content for their students, but they are trying to build relationships with students through TikTok.  What are your thoughts about teachers building relationships through social media such as TikTok? 

How can students provide meaningful content on Twitter such as Brooke Pavek?    Can teachers provide quality supplemental learning experiences such as the Instituteofhumananatomy, melscience, or chemteacherphil.  Can the learning objective be achieved in a different setting, such as Flipgrid, or a contained YouTube video?  Would students be as engaged in the content if it was not on TikTok?  I still have big questions regarding navigating TikTok in educational spaces as I believe this is still a grey area, filled with potential privacy issues with use in the classroom.

Let me know what you think about TikTok in the classroom.

Check out this great TikTok video by chemteacherphil:

@chemteacherphilWait for it… your patience will be rewarded. #chemistry #chemteacherphil #scienceismagic♬ Zero Gravity – Louie Zong

https://www.tiktok.com/embed.js

How Should Schools Change?

The culture of education in school has changed.  Even since I have left as a student in 2012.  I believe as I had stated in a previous blog post, “Learning and Unlearning”, teachers are no longer the gatekeepers of knowledge.  Students have access to knowledge through the internet.  Educators must become facilitators of learning. Too often we see teachers that are stuck in their ways, that have used classroom content that is no longer relevant, or teachers may not keep up to the best teaching practice of today’s age.  These are problematic problems that are happening in our schools.  However, we must also be mindful of how the teaching has changed.  Are we providing opportunities and support for our teachers to take risks and to find relevant content? Are we focusing too much on the content of our teaching or the process of learning?  How can we move students from knowledgeable to knowledge-able?

As educators, we need to shift how we teach students from teaching content to teaching students how to learn.  The Landscape of Learning provides educators many different resources for how to introduce and teach the following skills.

  • Craft Meaningful questions
  • access and apply useful information from resources (information literacy)
  • How to think creatively and critically to solve problems
  • Reflection

Many teachers are still working on unlearning traditional practices such as daily homework, and lecture-based instruction.  For change, there needs to be buy-in from teachers.  Teachers need to be on-board and want to change.

I believe that teachers need to leverage technology as a vehicle for learning.  Many teachers are still using technology as a “one time experience”.  This does not provide opportunities for students to grow or continue their learning.  By using a framework such as the SAMR model and the ITSE standards for students and teachers it can provide teachers with direction to use technology appropriately for their learners.

Teachers are often reluctant to try new tools, or opportunities because they are afraid of failing.   We discussed the terms digital native and digital citizen in-depth in class, and the problematic nature of these terms.  As Leigh wrote about in her blog post, “Some People were born knowing how to use technology without needing to be taught and others do.” Furthermore, I believe this is problematic because many of our students do not have access to this technology outside of school.  These terms are also very superficial.  Many students are aware and understand technology, but they may not understand how the code works, or how the app interacts with our personal data.  We live in an era in which we can make connections that were never possible before.  We can connect students to each other, as educators, we can grow our practices by connecting through tools such as Twitter or by sharing Open Educational Resources (OERs) all which would have been difficult to accomplish in prior generations.

When I think of this question I think back to the traditional classroom. Students in rows, a teacher at the front, students quiet.  Yes, there still may be appropriate times for this to take place.  But effective learning studies have shown otherwise.   If we provide opportunities for students to take ownership of their learning such as “self-reported grades“, or provide learning opportunities such as the “jigsaw method” these teaching practices have shown that students will be more successful according to John Hattie.

In our curriculum, we have outcomes that refer to the content of what we are teaching students.  As a society, we need to take a step back and look at the skills that we are teaching students.  These goals are found in the front of our curriculum.  We want to teach our students to become lifelong learners, develop a sense of self, community, and place, and to be an engaged citizen.  If we follow Michael Wesch’s concept of knowledge-able we can put a focus on these bigger goals inside our curriculum. Combining these opportunities with the standards laid out by ISTE provides a framework that I try to follow as an educator.  How are you trying to improve your practice as an educator to more from knowledgeable to knowledge-able?

 

 

Digital Citizenship Major Project: An In-Depth App Analysis

For my major project I have decided will entail my personal journey into digital media both personally, and educationally.  In my current position it is an expectation that we are up and current on trending educational technology that is implemented into the classroom, as well as having an idea of the technology that our students are using on a daily basis.  I have decided that because this project fits well within the context of my position as an instructional technology consultant that it would be a great asset to share with my school division, and aid in the implementation of these apps for teachers in our division.  As an EdTech Leader we often look at the purpose of the apps, in addition to one of our main concerns with the implementation of new technology, privacy.  Some of the questions we have to look at include:

  • Where is the student information stored?
  • What happens if the company sells?
  • Do companies sell student data?
  • Are students being marketed towards?

The apps that I am going to look at include

  • TikTok (An app that is fairly new to me that could potentially has engaging potential for education),
  • Seesaw (A very popular app that is being used by many educators in ourschool division, I have some experience with Seesaw)
  • Wakelet (A fairly new app to me, but again have some experience but have seen limited use in the classroom)
  • and as Matteo is doing (time permitting a surprise app)

I am still trying to fabricate how I am going to present, and the information that I am going to gather.  There currently is a lot of educational websites that tackle investigations into these apps, such as Common Sense Media.  I want to make something different, while still providing the full review of the app. Currently I am hoping on housing these full reviews on a web creation site such as Adobe Spark Page in which I have played around briefly with, or with Adobe Dreamweaver, in which I have no experience with, but would tie in nicely with some of the coding experience I have taken in my last course.

My current ideas for providing my in-depth app analysis includes:

  • description
  • in-depth review
  • tutorials
  • privacy policy,
  • educational value
  • lessons
  • testimonies
  • podcasts
  • Alignment to the ISTE Standards (What our school division follows)

Where applicable I will encourage teachers I am working with to look at the use of apps in an educational setting or to use the apps within a personal setting, and get their feedback on using the applications.  I will possibly with school division permission, pilot the educational apps and provide testimonies of the classroom experiences.  These experiences will be documented not only on the website that will be created but as well as through Twitter.

Time permitting I will like to take a deep dive into how teachers are implementing these apps within the classroom, and hopefully step outside my comfort zone and produce some podcasts related to teachers who are implementing these programs in the classroom.  For podcasting I plan to use Anchor, this is a very user friendly app that I have used with students and will suit my needs perfectly for podcasting this semester.

I am excited to venture into this project as it will allow me to research and reflect on my learning as a educator, and as a EdTech leader for my school division.

 

A Bit about Me, Curtis Bourassa

A bit about me.  Currently I am an Instructional Technology Consultant with South East Cornerstone Public School Division.  I like to think that my job is one of the best jobs in the field of education as it allows me to observe what other teachers are doing in their classroom, opened many learning experiences and opportunities, allows for co-teaching, and shares my passion for using technology appropriately in the classroom.

Outside of the classroom, I currently am in the midst of wedding planning and this has taken up a large amount of my time.  I also enjoy travelling in my summers, spending time catching up with friends, and watching and playing sports.

ECI832: Digital Citizenship is of interest to me because I believe it is critical that we teach students, and become aware as educators how to become digital citizens.  We need to teach students and educators to be critical consumers of the the digital content we are exposed to.  This class pairs hand-in-hand with my position as an Instructional Technology Consultant, and thus I am excited learn and share my learning with others.