Ribble’s Nine Elements of Digital Citizenship, and a Critical Questions on TikTok

This far into my major project I have been compiling information on Wakelet, Seesaw, and TikTok.  Be sure to check out the continued progress of the work that I am compiling on my second website, Curtis Bourassa’s Edtech Reviews. Over the past couple of weeks, I have begun to branch out and approach teachers about each one of the apps that I am studying.  In addition, I have gone to PD sessions for some of the apps that I am studying and building off of the connections and resources that I have made. 

Last week we learned about Mike Ribble’s nine elements of digital citizenship.  These elements help provide a framework for me to use these apps in the educational setting.  I will be following Jennifer Casa-Todd’s format of how to implement these tools into Education from her book, SocialLEADia.  I will highlight how my tools can be used in accordance with Mike Ribble’s Nine Elements.  

  • Digital access 
  • Digital communication
  • Digital Law
  • Digital security
  • Digital commerce
  • Digital health and wellness
  • Digital literacy
  • Digital etiquette 
  • Digital rights and responsibilities 

These digital elements can apply to many online tools or apps. Using Ribble’s framework will “help direct questions and your teaching when practicing digital leadership”.

Seesaw

  • Connect with students and other classes from around the world, and create a global classroom (Digital Communication)
  • Recognize that not everyone has access to the technology, or that the access is not equal access. (Digital Access)
  • Even young students can learn how to use technology appropriately by commenting and responding thoughtfully in a controlled environment (Digital Etiquette)
  • Ask thoughtful and critical questions when are not sure of someone’s content of questions (Digital Communication)

Wakelet

  • Students have the ability to curate their own resources.  This could provide the opportunity for students to look at in-depth their resources.  To determine if their resources are credible and reliable. (Digital Literacy)
  • Students will have the ability to collaborate on resources together.  Or send resource lists to each other. (Digital Communication)
  • Students will use material ethically, including citing sources appropriately.  (Digital Rights and Responsibilities)

TikTok

  • Provide content in a meaningful way, get students to determine the purpose of their content. (Digital Communication, Digital Etiquette) 
  • Look at in-depth terms of service agreements, and privacy policy.  What does this app track, how is it using my data? (Digital law, digital literacy, digital security)
  • Understand that anyone can see our post even if they are not following us.  (Digital Security)
  • Understand and set up guidelines for using TikTok, appropriate time and place, using (Digital health and wellness)
  • By using the digital wellbeing portion of the app users can limit screen time and restrictive content within TikTok. 
  • Understanding and reporting inappropriate use, or content on TikTok (Digital Rights and Responsibilities)

As educators, the connections above list some of the practices we would want our students to follow as a (digital) citizen in the above apps mentioned. When it comes to teaching students, as Jennifer Casa-Todd states, this is based on what we want students to know but we have to be explicit about what we are teaching. 

Major Project Update

Within my major digital project, I am spending a lot of time researching and exploring TikTok. I am struggling to find an appropriate way personally to rationalize TikTok used as an educational app. This is due to the questionable content that is found within the app. However, I also realize that the majority of middle year to high school students are users of TikTok.  Therefore it provides an opportunity for education and learning opportunities for TikTok. I have reached out to some teachers that are using TikTok in the classroom. On one of my early morning commutes to work, I decided to listen to The House of Edtech one of my educational podcasts focusing on edtech, the episode, TikTok for Teachers and #TikTokEDU. I then went on to look more in-depth on how these teachers are using TikTok in the classroom.  I ended up following Jeremy Rinkel, and reaching out regarding some future questions I have of using TikTok in education. 

Here are some other TikTok teachers/students to explore on TikTok. 

  • Brooke Pavek: A High School Senior Student who creates creative videos that could be directly linked to curricular outcomes in many areas.  Check out this TIME article showcasing some of Brooke’s creative work.
  • Brooke Rogers: a Middle School English teacher, who creates teacher content and student content. 
  • Jeremy Rinkel: A High School English Teacher, who creates content for students and teachers. 

After listening to the podcast what really stood out to me was that many of these teachers are not just creating content for their students, but they are trying to build relationships with students through TikTok.  What are your thoughts about teachers building relationships through social media such as TikTok? 

How can students provide meaningful content on Twitter such as Brooke Pavek?    Can teachers provide quality supplemental learning experiences such as the Instituteofhumananatomy, melscience, or chemteacherphil.  Can the learning objective be achieved in a different setting, such as Flipgrid, or a contained YouTube video?  Would students be as engaged in the content if it was not on TikTok?  I still have big questions regarding navigating TikTok in educational spaces as I believe this is still a grey area, filled with potential privacy issues with use in the classroom.

Let me know what you think about TikTok in the classroom.

Check out this great TikTok video by chemteacherphil:

@chemteacherphilWait for it… your patience will be rewarded. #chemistry #chemteacherphil #scienceismagic♬ Zero Gravity – Louie Zong

https://www.tiktok.com/embed.js